Articles Posted in Multiple Sclerosis

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Scientists have welcome news for the more than 2.3 million people across the globe who live with multiple sclerosis. According to researchers, a new breakthrough drug can help reduce symptoms, and delay progression of this painful and debilitating disease, even in people who do not respond to any other treatments.

The new drug is expected to be approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as early as March. The drug called OCREVUS has been found to significantly delay the progression of symptoms of the disease, and limit the extent of physical disability in people who suffer from primary progressive multiple sclerosis. The drug reduces the frequency of attacks in these people.

MS can be a difficult condition to treat, because it affects different people in different ways. The severity of symptoms may differ between two different people, and the rate of progression may also vary. Many people with multiple sclerosis respond to some of the treatment drugs that are available on the market. These drugs are designed to limit symptoms, limit the progression of the disease, and reduce the number of attacks.

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Multiple Sclerosis, or MS, is an autoimmune inflammatory condition, which can affect the brain, spine, and nervous system. There are a wide range of symptoms that are associated with MS, and the condition itself has several degrees of severity. Therefore, qualifying for social security disability benefits for MS can be challenging.

The Social Security Administration (SSA) typically requires that a claimant must have suffered from the condition for a period of 12 months, or the condition is expected to last for at least 12 months before approving benefit payments. That, however, can be challenging in the case of Multiple Sclerosis because the symptoms tend to recur at inconsistent intervals.

For example, in the early stages of the condition, a person may suffer from a variety of symptoms, including numbness or changes in sensation in the hands and legs, swallowing problems, tremors, muscle fatigue, weakness, bowel and bladder management problems, difficulties in concentration, memory loss, blurred vision, sudden reflexes and muscular spasms. A person is said to be in “remission” during times when they are not experiencing symptoms.

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Patients who suffer from the debilitating condition multiple sclerosis (MS) may have new hope for treatment. Researchers have announced findings from a small clinical trial, which indicated significant benefits from the use of a patient’s own stem cells.

As part of the trial, patients were given a transplant of hematopoietic stem cells from their own bodies. According to researchers, patients experienced disease remission after the transplant. These particular types of stem cells are involved in the formation of blood, and are sourced from bone marrow. As part of the trial, patients were also given high-dose immunosuppressive medications.

The study’s findings were published recently in JAMA Neurology, and focused on an evaluation of 24 patients who suffered from MS. They suffered from a type of multiple sclerosis called active relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis, in which the patients have certain phases in which the condition is very active, followed by certain phases in which they do not experience any symptoms at all.

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Researchers working on a treatment for Multiple Sclerosis (MS) have reported progress. According to the teams from New York’s Rockefeller University and the University of California-Riverside, they have both used Indazole Chloride to successfully reverse the symptoms of MS. The studies were conducted in mice, and they found that the drug triggered regeneration of the protective coating of the nerve, or myelin sheath, that is typically destroyed when MS sets in.

Multiple Sclerosis is a condition in which a person may suffer from a steady and progressive breakdown of the nervous system, including the senses of hearing and vision, and motor control. As the disease progresses, the person may suffer from problems walking, difficulty with coordination, numb sensations in the arms or legs, muscular weakness, vision problems, hearing loss, loss of balance, and speech problems. Often times, a person with MS may suffer from complete and permanent paralysis.

MS is a disease that affects the body’s immune system and it’s estimated that, in the United States alone. more than 40,000 people suffer this debilitating disease.