The Social Security Disability system in the United States is very complicated. Whether you are a recently disabled father trying to provide for your family, a single mother who can no longer work because of an illness, or the parent of a child who needs extra help because of a challenging condition, obtaining benefits is not easy. The “system” involves a complex set of rules and requirements that make it very hard for the average person to successfully receive payments.

There is hope, however, and we appreciate you looking for help here. Our law firm provides unique benefits to clients just like you, which include:

  • A singular focus on representing the injured and disabled.
  • Having all important work performed by an experienced disability attorney.
  • A guarantee that you pay no fees unless you obtain social security disability benefits.
  • A proven track record of success in both routine and difficult cases.

Regardless of whether you are considering filing for benefits for the first time, or have been denied numerous times in the past, please call our office at (404) 255-9838. We will discuss your options free of charge, and help you make an informed decision about what to do next. We look forward to talking with you.

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Persons who suffer from renal failure, kidney failure or kidney disease, may be eligible for Social Security disability benefits under the impairment listing provided by the Social Security Administration.  This impairment listing specifies conditions that define if a person is eligible for benefits. The Social Security listing for genitourinary impairments also includes kidney disease.

If you suffer from kidney disease or renal failure, SSA will consider a number of factors to determine whether your symptoms are severe enough for you to be eligible for benefits.  If your renal failure has resulted in the need for dialysis on an ongoing and regular basis, or if you suffer from complications like nephrotic syndrome, you may be eligible for benefits.  Persons who have undergone a kidney transplant could also be eligible for benefits.

Apart from these, persons who suffer from chronic kidney disease, and other complications of kidney disease such as extreme hypertension, heart failure, stroke, or other complications, may also be eligible.

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If the examiner handling your disability claim wants you to undergo a consultative medical exam, it may be in your best interest to do so.  Keep in mind, however, that being asked to undergo a consultative medical exam doesn’t necessarily mean that your examiner does not believe you have a genuine claim for benefits.  It may simply mean that they want more information about your condition.

Typically, a consultative medical exam is very brief, and is performed by a doctor who is paid by the Social Security Administration (SSA) to conduct your exam. These doctors do not work for SSA, but are contracted by the agency to perform these services. You might find that the doctor in charge of your consultative medical exam is very brief, and even possibly curt with you. It’s not uncommon for patients to be bewildered at the rudeness that they encounter from the physician performing their consultative medical exam. Don’t take it personally. The fact is that you are not an ongoing patient of the doctor and therefore, he or she may not feel the need to be particularly cordial or expansive in their explanations.

Also, remember that the doctor will be looking for signs that your condition is not as medically impairing as you’ve claimed it to be.  If you walk into the doctor’s office with a limp, don’t be surprised to find him peeking from behind curtains to make sure that you’re not walking back to the car with a spring in your step.

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Many of the Social Security disability claims that are filed every year are denied in the initial stages. In fact, according to some estimates, approximately 50% of all initial disability claims are denied.

There are medical as well as non-medical reasons for a denial. The most common reasons for the denial of a claim are medical. When a claim is denied for medical reasons, it means that the Social Security Administration (SSA) simply did not find that a person’s disability is serious enough to prevent them from going back to the work they performed previously, or performing any kind of work that would earn a sufficient income.

Remember, SSA has strict criteria which it uses to evaluate the severity of impairments and to determine whether they significantly impede an individual’s ability to work and earn an income. If the Social Security Disability Administration finds that you have a severe impairment which prevents you from being able to do the work you did in the past, or any other kind of work, and if you’re currently not earning a substantial gainful income, your chances of getting your claim approved are higher.

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The Social Security disability hearing is the most important stage in your benefits claim process.

It’s important to be prepared for your disability hearing, so that you can give appropriate answers to the questions asked. You can expect the administrative law judge (ALJ) in charge of your hearing to ask you several questions about your medical condition.

You will be asked about your health and the medical condition from which you suffer. Expect plenty of questions about the kind of symptoms that you have, and the frequency and intensity of those symptoms.  In most cases, you will be asked very specific questions about the physical and mental limitations you suffer as a result of your condition.

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Filing a claim for Social Security disability benefits when you suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can be challenging. The importance of medical documentation in supporting your claim simply cannot be overstated.  Therefore, you will want to work with your attorney to make sure that all documentation is in order, including summary notes from doctors, counselors, and other health care providers.  It is also important to include clinical notes from your therapists and psychiatrists.

Your claim will depend very strongly on your ability to prove that your PTSD impacts your ability to work for a living. Therefore, you must also complete a Residual Functional Capacity (RFC) form, which is available from your doctor or disability lawyer.

This form must be filled out, and must clearly indicate how your condition prevents you from working.  The documentation in your Residual Functional Capacity (RFC) document must clearly define your inability to maintain a consistent routine without help or supervision, and the difficulties you face concentrating on tasks.

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It can take the Social Security Administration weeks and even months to make a final determination regarding your claim for disability benefits, but there are things that you can do to help expedite the process.

One of the most effective ways to speed up the process has to do with medical records and treatment information. You will want to provide detailed medical documentation about your condition and care, including the names of past and current doctors who were/are involved in your treatment, as well as the facilities where you’ve have procedures. Detailed information will make it easier for the examiner to follow up on the sources that you have cited and verify the information upon which your disability is based.

In addition, try to keep all of your doctor appointments and avoid rescheduling them if at all possible. Remember, if you ask for a change in the scheduled appointment, you may have to wait weeks or months, which could add significant time to the claim process.

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Women or men who have been diagnosed with breast cancer and find that their condition no longer allows them to work may be eligible to receive Social Security disability benefits.

It’s very normal for a person to be traumatized, concerned and stressed after any cancer diagnosis. There are doctor appointments to get to, treatment options to consider, and financial stresses to contend with. Among those financial considerations is the issue of whether you are eligible for Social Security disability benefits.

Social Security does provide for disability benefits for persons suffering from cancer. However, merely a cancer diagnosis on its own will not make you eligible for benefits under the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program. The Social Security Administration will consider your cancer a qualifying disability if you are not capable of performing the work that you did before being diagnosed with cancer, and if the cancer makes it difficult for you to do certain types of work. Also, your cancer must have lasted, or be expected to last, for at least 12 months, or to result in death for you to be eligible for benefits.

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The time it takes to receive a decision on social security disability benefits will depend on many factors. In many case, unfortunately, the process of approving claims is very slow because of the large backlog of claims at the Social Security Administration (SSA). The time delay is also due to the large number of disability beneficiaries, and the increase in the number of beneficiaries every year.

Typically however, you can expect a time gap of 30-90 days before your disability claim is processed. However, that is the average time, and some claims may not result in a decision for up to two years after the claim has been filed.

Simply stated, there are no definite answers about how long it will take for your claim to be processed. It usually takes time for your doctor’s office to provide the examiner with the medical documentation and evidence that is necessary to decide your claim. Claims examiners are very busy, and may be in charge of processing hundreds of claims.

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When you qualify for Social Security Disability Insurance Benefits (SSDI), you are automatically eligible for a number of forms of assistance.

For starters, you are immediately eligible for monthly cash benefits. These disability benefits will be in the form of checks that you receive every month. The amount will depend on a number of factors, including the amount that you have contributed in taxes to the Social Security system, as well as your work history.

A Social Security disability beneficiary will also become eligible for Medicare benefits. This eligibility will kick in two years after you become eligible to receive disability benefits.

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The disability benefits application process can be difficult and confusing. The Social Security Administration (SSA) will conduct an assessment of your ability to perform certain tasks before it makes a determination of your disability and benefit payments.

The agency does this by conducting a residual functional assessment of what you can continue to do. It will also evaluate whether you are capable of working in some other capacity or in a different field than your previous one. The assessment will be conducted by a disability claims examiner together with a medical expert.

The assessment will focus on whether you can perform different levels of activity. For example, it will evaluate whether your disability allows you to perform sedentary activity that involves a lot of sitting and occasional standing or walking, or if you are capable of light work. Being able to perform light work generally means that you are able to lift up to 20 pounds frequently. You must also be able to stand and walk about frequently.