Articles Tagged with ssdi

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Research shows that stem cell therapy has many benefits for arthritis patients, especially those who suffer from advanced stages of the condition.

According to ongoing studies, stem cell therapy may not promise a complete cure for arthritis, but could trigger the production of healthy cells that can replace damaged cells. These stem cell transplants are now being used to replace damaged cartilage between joints.

Arthritis is a condition involving inflammation of the joints, swelling and pain. Over time, joints can become weak, and the pain chronic. There are several types of arthritis, the most common being osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that more than 50 million Americans have been diagnosed with some form of arthritis.

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Children who suffer from a mental or physical disability may be at a much higher risk of suffering from abuse or neglect.

Those are the results of a new study that yielded disturbing findings. According to the study, children who suffer from mental or behavioral disorders have a heightened risk of abuse, and those risks differ depending on the type of disorder from which the child suffers.

Researchers found that children who suffer from autism, spina bifida, and Down syndrome, are not at a high risk of abuse, but those who suffer from intellectual disabilities or mental/behavioral disorders such as depression and developmental delays are much more likely to experience abuse or neglect.  Moreover, children whose parents lack support to deal with their child’s disability, or are overwhelmed by the responsibility of caring for a disabled child, are much more likely to suffer from neglect.

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Simply stated, you should file a claim for disability benefits as quickly as possible.

It is important to keep in mind that the actual process of approving your claim may take many months because of either backlog at the Social Security Administration or other factors beyond your control.    Also remember that if your claim is denied – and many claims are denied every year- you may have to go through an equally lengthy appeals process before you get your claim approved.  If your initial appeal is denied, you may want to file another appeal.  Overall, this process may take up to two years.  During this time, your medical condition could worsen, causing you additional financial distress.  For that reason and for many others, it is important to get started on filing a claim as quickly as possible.

Sometimes, Social Security disability attorneys work with clients who have waited a very long before filing a claim for benefits.  In many cases, people do so because they believe that their condition will get better and that they will eventually be able to return to work and earn the same income as before.  It’s natural to feel that way, and optimism is good.  However, if things don’t work out as planned it is better to have the financial resources necessary for your living expenses.

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Many of the Social Security disability claims that are filed every year are denied in the initial stages. In fact, according to some estimates, approximately 50% of all initial disability claims are denied.

There are medical as well as non-medical reasons for a denial. The most common reasons for the denial of a claim are medical. When a claim is denied for medical reasons, it means that the Social Security Administration (SSA) simply did not find that a person’s disability is serious enough to prevent them from going back to the work they performed previously, or performing any kind of work that would earn a sufficient income.

Remember, SSA has strict criteria which it uses to evaluate the severity of impairments and to determine whether they significantly impede an individual’s ability to work and earn an income. If the Social Security Disability Administration finds that you have a severe impairment which prevents you from being able to do the work you did in the past, or any other kind of work, and if you’re currently not earning a substantial gainful income, your chances of getting your claim approved are higher.

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It is relatively uncommon that a person will qualify for benefits under both the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program as well as the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program. In fact, the vast majority of benefits recipients will qualify for benefits under only one of these programs.

However, that doesn’t mean that this can’t happen. A person may qualify for benefits under both of these programs. The Social Security Disability Insurance program is unique, distinct and separate from the Supplemental Security Income program. Eligibility criteria for both of the programs are different, but in some circumstances, persons may qualify for benefits under both programs.

If, for instance, your income and asset limits are low enough for you to qualify for the Supplemental Security Income Program, and at the same time you have held a job long enough to have paid into the Disability Insurance program, you could possibly qualify for both of the benefits simultaneously. These types of benefits are called “concurrent benefits.”