Articles Tagged with “social security payments”

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On October 11, 2018, the Social Security Administration (SSA) announced that social security payments will increase for more than 67 million Americans in 2019 as part of the cost-of-living adjustment. Payments are set to rise 2.8% for social security beneficiaries 2019, as a result of inflation. This increase will take effect on December 31, 2018, for the 8 million recipients of SSI and in January 2019 for 62 million Americans receiving Social Security.  For individuals receiving SSI, the maximum federal payment will increase to $771 per month, an increase from $750 per month this year. This cost-of-living adjustment is slightly higher than the increase of 2% from 2017 to 2018, which is good news for those receiving Social Security benefits. For a fact sheet showing the effects of this adjustment, click here.

The maximum amount of earnings subject to the Social Security taxes will increase as well, from $128,400 to $132,900. Those receiving Social Security or SSI benefits are typically notified via mail in early December about their new benefit amount. However, this year for this first time, many people will also be able to view their benefits for the following year online at  www.socialsecurity.gov/myaccount.

If you have any questions about cost-of-living adjustments or applying for disability benefits, contact this law firm. 

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When persons who suffer a heart attack do not receive treatment immediately, they are much more likely to return to work later, and also frequently must enter into an early retirement. Those findings come from research that was recently presented at the Acute Cardiac Care Congress.

According to the Congress, delays from the time a call has been made to emergency medical services to when treatment is received, can lead to an increase in mortality and heart failure after a myocardial infarction.

Until now, researchers have not been able to tell whether delayed treatment had any real and tangible effect on return to work after treatment. The researchers decided to investigate this particular area because a delayed return to work, or a premature retirement after heart attack, is often financially disastrous for patients.