Articles Tagged with hearing loss

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Women who are on hormone replacement therapy may be at a much higher risk of deafness. According to a new study, while menopause at an older age is already a high risk factor for hearing problems, hormone replacement therapy seems to exacerbate those risks.

Researchers have always known that women are at a high risk of suffering from hearing loss after menopause. Natural hormonal levels decline during this period of time, and doctors earlier believed that providing hormone replacement therapy could help protect menopausal women against hearing loss linked to menopause. The researchers in the new study found that women who used hormone therapy actually had higher risks of hearing issues. In fact, the risk increased with the duration of time that the woman was on hormone therapy. The longer the duration of the hormone replacement therapy, the greater the deafness risk.

The findings of the study come from an analysis of more than 81,000 women in the United States. The researchers are quick to point out that the results are not evidence of a cause-and-effect relationship between hormone driven therapy and a heightened deafness risk.

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The Social Security Administration (SSA) makes it possible for persons with hearing loss to qualify for benefits. However, the level of hearing loss must be severe or profound. Mild or moderate hearing loss typically does not qualify for benefits.

If your hearing loss has not resulted in you getting a cochlear implant, you must undergo either an audiometry test or a word recognition test to determine if you qualify for benefits. The autometry test must prove that your hearing threshold is worse than or equal to 90 decibels (dB). In the word recognition test, your score must be a maximum of 40% in the better ear. These tests must be conducted without the use of hearing aids.

If, however, you have cochlear implants in either one or both ears, you will automatically qualify for disability benefits. These benefits will last for up to one year after the initial determination.  If your word recognition score continues to remain below or at 60%, your benefits will be extended beyond that period of time.