Articles Tagged with “disability payments”

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Schizophrenia is a mental disorder that can result in hallucinations, delusions, and altered thinking.  It is a serious psychological disorder, and is typically confirmed upon diagnosis by a psychiatrist.

The Social Security Administration (SSA) lists schizophrenia in its “blue book” as one of the disorders that are eligible for disability benefits.  A diagnosis by a qualified healthcare professional confirming that you suffer from the disorder is essential. Furthermore, you must be able to show that you have suffered from schizophrenia for at least a month, or that your condition is expected to last for at least 12 months.

To qualify for benefits under SSA’s criteria, you must also prove that your disorder results in at least one of the several symptoms associated with this disorder, including audio and visual hallucinations, (seeing or hearing things that are not there), illogical thinking, emotional withdrawal, or non-responsiveness. Suffering from at least one of these symptoms must severely restrict your ability to function normally, and affect concentration and attention.

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Persons who suffer from HIV/AIDS may qualify for Social Security disability benefits under certain circumstances.  The Social Security Administration (SSA) requires that the HIV/AIDS condition has lasted for, and is expected to last for, at least 12 months, or is expected to result in the death of the person.

SSA requires evidence that the infection has resulted in a condition which prohibits the person from working.  An HIV diagnosis, although difficult emotionally, will not automatically qualify a person for Social Security disability benefits. It is important to provide evidence that your symptoms are so severe that they make it difficult for you to engage in what the SSA refers to as Substantial Gainful Activity.  Persons who are asymptomatic, or do not have severe symptoms of HIV/ AIDS symptoms, may therefore not qualify for benefits under these criteria.

You must provide strong medical evidence about your eligibility for benefits, such as a full medical history, complete clinical course of the illness, diagnostic lab results, and any other documents that detail your condition and symptoms.

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Dairy products get a lot of bad press, but yogurt could actually have more than a few health benefits. According to new research, increasing your intake of yogurt could actually lower your risk of developing Type II Diabetes.

Researchers recently called for more clinical trials on the effect of increased intake of yogurt on diabetes prevention. Those calls were linked to findings that seem to suggest a lower risk of Type II Diabetes after increasing consumption of yogurt. The study was published in the journal BMC Medicine and was based on an analysis of data from three different studies.

About 95% of diabetes cases in the United States involve Type II Diabetes. Diabetes is one of the conditions that could qualify you for Social Security disability benefits. However, a diagnosis by itself does not make you eligible to receive disability payments from the government. You must prove that your condition has resulted in symptoms that make it difficult for you to work. For instance, complications from diabetes can include renal failure, kidney damage, kidney function eye problems, and blindness. Additionally, these conditions must have lasted for 12 months, or must be expected to last for at least 12 months for you to be eligible for benefits.

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According to new research in the Annals of Internal Medicine Journal, people who are unable to control their diabetes are much more likely to experience a faster rate of cognitive decline. This would include the onset of symptoms such as poor memory, poor word recall, and impaired functioning. According to the recent study, approximately 19% of the participants who were analyzed were found to experience such symptoms. In fact, researchers found that these participants experienced cognitive decline five years earlier than people who did not suffer from diabetes.

Cognitive decline can be extremely difficult for an individual, and it is often associated with dementia. A large number of studies now link diabetes to dementia. For example, one study found that people who suffer from Type II diabetes have a higher risk of suffering from Alzheimer’s disease.

Controlling diabetes is critical, and studies continue to point to the serious long-term health consequences of failure to control blood sugar levels.

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When patients with lupus are admitted into a hospital for treatment of their symptoms, they may have a much higher risk of being readmitted back into the hospital within 30 days after discharge. According to a new study, as many as one in six hospitalized patients with lupus require a readmission.

One factor that contributes to the high readmission rates is the severity of the symptoms. However, there may be other factors involved. According to researchers, it is possible to reduce the risk of a readmission after hospitalization by planning the patient’s discharge better, and by addressing differences in post-discharge treatment.

Patients who suffer from lupus very often find themselves needing hospitalization. This is a condition in which the human body faces an attack by the immune system. Lupus is one of those medical conditions about which much remains unknown, which in turn makes treatment options challenging. This much is known about Lupus, however; there are genetic factors that can increase the likelihood of developing the condition.

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Bipolar disorder, also known as manic depressive, is a chronic mental illness, which is believed to affect as many as 1.6% of the general American population. There is much that we do not know about this difficult psychiatric condition.

For years, scientists have been researching whether a person’s genes could play a contributing factor in the development of bipolar disorder. German researchers recently said that they have managed to identify unique genes that could possibly contribute to the condition.

According to the researchers, it seems that a variety of genes are involved in the development of bipolar disorder, and it’s not just one specific gene that causes the development of the condition. These genes interact with environmental factors in a complex manner to cause symptoms of the condition. A person who suffers from bipolar disorder often suffers from alternate spells of mania and depression, or highs and lows. He may suffer from sleeplessness, insomnia, irritability, and may engage in risky behaviors involving alcohol, drug and sex.