Articles Tagged with dementia

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Adults who suffer from Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) have a risk of dementia that is three times as high as for those without a history of ADHD. This is according to a new study out of Taiwan.

In the United States, as many as 4% of all adults have been diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. A person who suffers from ADHD may struggle with irritability, anxiety, hyperactivity and other characteristics that are typical of this condition. In some children who are diagnosed with this condition, symptoms begin to taper off, becoming less pronounced as the child gets older. However, this doesn’t happen in every case.

This recent study was conducted in Taiwan, and focused on more than 670 adults between the ages of 18 and 54 who had been diagnosed with ADHD in 2000. These persons were compared with 2000 adults who did not suffer from the condition. The study progressed over 10 years, and over this period of time, the researchers found that the adults who suffered from ADHD were 3.4 times more likely to develop symptoms of dementia than those who did not suffer from ADHD.

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According to new research in the Annals of Internal Medicine Journal, people who are unable to control their diabetes are much more likely to experience a faster rate of cognitive decline. This would include the onset of symptoms such as poor memory, poor word recall, and impaired functioning. According to the recent study, approximately 19% of the participants who were analyzed were found to experience such symptoms. In fact, researchers found that these participants experienced cognitive decline five years earlier than people who did not suffer from diabetes.

Cognitive decline can be extremely difficult for an individual, and it is often associated with dementia. A large number of studies now link diabetes to dementia. For example, one study found that people who suffer from Type II diabetes have a higher risk of suffering from Alzheimer’s disease.

Controlling diabetes is critical, and studies continue to point to the serious long-term health consequences of failure to control blood sugar levels.