Articles Tagged with “colon cancer”

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Colostomies are performed in some cases of colon cancer, or severe cases of gastrointestinal illness or Irritable Bowel Syndrome. After a colostomy, stools are no longer emptied through the rectum and the anus. Instead, they are passed into the colostomy bag or pouch which must be replaced 2 to 3 times a day.

A colostomy can be the very last resort for persons who suffer from severe gastrointestinal illnesses. It is often the only choice for persons who suffer from colon cancer, requiring removal of parts of their large intestine or colon as part of treatment.

There are several complications associated with the use of a colostomy bag after a colostomy. There may be a stoma blockage when stools do not get emptied in time. This can cause cramps, pain, swelling in the stoma, nausea, and diarrhea. A warm bath and intake of fluids can help ease the blockage. If this does not help, however, get in touch with your doctor immediately. Other complications include a stoma prolapse in which the stoma extends far beyond the surface of the skin. In this case, internal leakage may necessitate additional surgeries.

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According to new studies, exercising, maintaining a healthy diet and practicing relaxation techniques in the weeks before colon cancer surgery could actually help a person recover quicker.

The results came from a study consisting of 38 patients. These patients were put through a “prehabilitation” program for roughly 24 days. During the prehabilitation, they took part in approximately 50 minutes of physical exercise three days a week, and were administered a personalized nutrition program that included whey protein supplementation. They were also given lessons for relaxation techniques to help reduce stress.

After surgery, patients who were put through the prehabilitation program were compared to another group of patients who were only put through the rehabilitation program, and were not given pre-surgery prep. Researchers found that those patients who had been given prehabilitation preparation before the surgery walked approximately 25 meters longer in six minutes, compared to patients in the group that did not undergo prehabilitation. According to the researchers, this clearly indicates that rehabilitation helps a person recover after a surgery, and better prepares them for the stresses of surgery.