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Social Security Disability Benefits for Children with Birth Defects

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Having a child diagnosed with a birth defect can be a traumatic experience for any parent.  Besides the emotional toll that such a diagnosis can take on parents, there are also the financial implications to consider. Many such conditions require occupational therapy, speech and language therapy and other treatments to help the child manage or overcome the limitations placed on him or her by the defect.

There are several types of birth defects that could qualify your child for Social Security disability benefits.  These benefits can prove to be a substantial source of income for your child that could help meet some of his uninsured therapy needs.

It’s hard to predict whether your child will be eligible for disability benefits for his condition. Two children with the same disability may not be equally eligible for benefits. Mild defects that allow the chill to lead a normal life will not be considered for disability benefits.

The Social Security Administration is the agency that will determine if your child qualifies for disability benefits for the defect.  In making this decision, the Administration will primarily look at your child’s medical condition, and how this will affect his ability to lead a normal life. The defect or disability has to be very serious or severe in order for your child to qualify for disability benefits. For example, a child with serious cerebral palsy that results in motor impairments and speech and language impairments may be more likely to qualify for disability benefits for his condition. Not only that, but the defect must have also lasted for a minimum of 12 months or must be expected to last for a minimum of 12 months for the child to qualify for Social Security disability benefits.

Apart from this, the Social Security Administration will also consider your work history as well as financial status before making a decision on your condition.

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