Articles Posted in Social Security Administration (SSA)

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Women are likely to be at risk for a variety of health conditions, especially as they get older. Fortunately, many conditions that are often faced by women are now covered by benefits under the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program. For instance, cervical and ovarian cancer often require patients to seek disability benefits as the disease progresses and makes it impossible for them to continue working. Ovarian cancer affects one out of every 78 women and is more likely for women over the age of 60. Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers affecting women, and the American Cancer Society predicts that more than 4,000 women will die of cervical cancer in 2019. It is most likely to affect women between the ages of 35 and 44. The number of women dying from cervical cancer has dropped since pap smear tests became more common, leading to earlier diagnoses.

Turner syndrome is another condition that affects only females, characterized by several physical abnormalities. The condition can also be accompanied by heart conditions, hearing problems, and some level of intellectual disability too. Women with Turner’s syndrome may also be at a higher risk of osteoarthritis.

Rett Syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects only females. The condition is characterized by physical features like smaller limbs, mental impairment, impaired speech, and seizures. A child with Rett Syndrome can qualify for Social Security disability benefits under the Compassionate Allowances program, which allows for expedited processing of claims.

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The number of women who are protected by and qualify for Social Security disability benefits has increased significantly over the past few years.  However, a recent and strong work record is very important for women who wish to qualify for disability benefits. The increase in female Social Security disability beneficiaries is linked to the increase in the number of women joining the workforce over the past few decades. Those numbers increased with the rise of the women’s rights movement and with women’s increased entrance into the workforce in the 1970s. Those numbers have leveled among younger women, but have continued to grow amongst women over 50.

Women over the age of 50 are the most likely to need Social Security disability benefits due to various health-related issues. They are at a higher risk for ovarian cancer and breast cancer. Menopause can bring with it a decrease in bone density and a higher risk of joint-related problems, including arthritis and osteoarthritis. A woman’s risk of cardiovascular conditions including heart disease, hypertension, diabetes, and stroke – all of which can leave her disabled – also increases after she crosses her half-century mark.

A recent, strong work record is important for any woman seeking Social Security disability benefits.  A woman must have worked for at least 5 years out of the last ten years to qualify for benefits. As many as three-quarters of all Social Security disability benefits payments are made to people above the age of 70. As women age, they must keep this in mind, and ensure that they have a well-documented record of employment in order to remain eligible for benefits in the event of a medical condition in the future.

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The best gift you can give your child after your love and care is financial security and a safety net that will help him in the case of an unforeseen situation later in life. When you are applying for your child’s birth certificate, remember to apply for a Social Security card at the same time. You can also apply at any Social Security office near you. You may be asked to provide evidence of your child’s name, age, proof of US citizenship as well as your identity proof.

Also, remember that your children may be eligible to receive benefits on your account. The eligibility criteria include your child being unmarried and below the age of 18. However, a child over 18 can be eligible for benefits too if they were suffering from the disability before they turned 22. Conditions for which a child may become eligible for benefits on your record include autism and visual impairments.

A woman may receive lower disability benefits than a man because of lower pay and frequent absences from employment. Many women take breaks after having children to raise their families, and unfortunately, they find that this has an impact on their disability benefits accruals.  If you have children, it’s even more important that you maintain a strong, recent, well-documented employment history, so that you can continue to maintain your eligibility for benefits.

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There will come a time when you are no longer eligible to receive Social Security disability benefits, even if you are still not medically fit enough to earn a sustainable income. When you reach retirement age and become eligible for retirement benefits, you may no longer be eligible to receive Social Security disability benefits. Full Social Security retirement benefits are available for seniors between the ages of 65 and 67.  If you have reached retirement age and are receiving Social Security disability benefits, your Social Security disability benefits will automatically turn into retirement benefits. You do not have to apply to receive your retirement benefits. 

In some cases, individuals may apply for early retirement at age 62. In such cases, they may be eligible for partial retirement benefits. In these special cases, these individuals may continue to receive Social security disability benefits as well as retirement benefits. However, they will not receive double benefits. They will only receive disability benefits so that they can receive their full benefit amount. There will be a cap on the retirement benefits a person can recover, just as there is a cap on the disability benefits he is eligible for.

Retirement benefits, unlike disability benefits, however, may increase with years. For instance, if you wait till you are 70 years old to access your retirement benefits instead of accessing them at age 62, you are likely to receive higher benefits payable every month.

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Social Security checks are deposited on certain days of the month. Typically, these dates correspond to your date of birth. If your birth date is between the 1st and 10th days of the month, your check will be deposited on the second Wednesday of the month. If your birth date is between the eleventh and twentieth days of the month, your payment will be deposited on the 3rd Wednesday  of the month. If your birth date falls after the 21st day of the month, you can expect your check to be deposited in your account by the 4th Wednesday of the month.

However, if you are receiving Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits, your benefits will be deposited on the third day of the month. If the date of your deposit falls on a Saturday or a holiday, the payment will be deposited one business day earlier.

The dates are different for SSI payments, so if you qualify for these benefits, check up on your due dates. Typically, these benefits are deposited on the first day of each month. If the first falls on a Saturday, Sunday or federal holiday, the check will deposit one banking day earlier.  If you find that your benefits have not been deposited by your due date, you can check up on the status of your benefits by calling the Social Security Administration on 1-800-772-1213. Delays are normal if you are still receiving your checks through the mail. To avoid these delays, switch to the electronic option, and have your benefits deposited directly into your bank account.

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April is National Social Security Month and is a great time to create a Social Security account if you haven’t done so yet. A mySocial Security account is a personalized account that allows you to access all the information you need. The account is free to set up and offers you access to your latest Social Security statements, allowing you to access real-time information about your statement and benefits. You can also receive estimates of the benefits that you are likely to be eligible for in the future, a useful tool when planning for the years ahead. The account helps you manage your Social Security account without any trouble and without any additional expense.

A mySocial Security account gives you the ability to determine your future benefits earnings. The system will calculate this based on a number of factors, including your history of benefits received in the past, as well as future earnings estimates. You can check up on the disability benefits payments that you are estimated to receive in the future as well as retirement benefits.  You can even investigate the benefits that your family members will be eligible for if you pass away as a result of your disability.

There are several other advantages of having a Social Security account. For instance, you can easily get a replacement card if your current card is missing or stolen. So, what are you waiting for? With all the information about your Social Security account you need at your fingertips, you can get better control of your account and ensure that you receive every cent of the benefits that you are eligible for.

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Being arrested or incarcerated can have a negative impact on your Social Security benefits. Being arrested by itself will not mean a suspension of your Social Security disability benefits.  If however, you have been arrested, charged and convicted of a crime, it could impact the benefits you receive.

If you have been convicted and held for a maximum of 30 days, there will be no impact on the Social Security disability benefits that you receive, either under the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program or the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program. If however, you are held in jail for longer than 30 days, your benefits may be suspended. You will cease to receive benefits as long as you are still incarcerated.

In the case of SSDI benefits, however, your suspension of benefits will occur only when you have actually been convicted of the crime. If you have been held for 30 days and have been convicted, your benefits payments will stop. You can resume payments without having to reapply once you are released from prison. In those cases in which you are held for longer than 30 days without a conviction, you will continue to be eligible for and receive benefits.

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Your spouse’s income or earnings could have a bearing on your disability benefits depending on the Social Security program under which you are receiving benefits. The Social Security runs two programs for people with disabilities – the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program and the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program.

To qualify for SSDI payments, you must have paid into the program during your time in the workforce. The SSI program, on the other hand, is a needs-based program. Under this program, you qualify for benefits if you belong to a low-income group and are unable to work. In fact, you do not need to be disabled to qualify for benefits.  Seniors above the age of 65 may also qualify for SSI benefits if they belong to a low- income category.

If your spouse is earning, it will have no bearing on your eligibility for benefits under the SSDI program. These benefits are reserved for those who have paid into the program, and as long as you have paid sufficiently into the program and meet other criteria, your spouse’s benefits will not impact your case. On the other hand, SSI may reduce the amount of benefits that you are eligible to recover if your spouse is earning above a certain level. If your spouse earns more than or has assets equal to or more than $3,000, you may not qualify for benefits under this program.

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When a person starts receiving Social Security benefits, members of his/her family may also begin receiving supplementary benefits under the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program. If the worker is eligible for Social Security benefits – meaning that he/she has paid taxes into the Social Security program – then the spouse and children may become eligible for dependent benefits. A disabled child who became disabled before the age of 22 may also be eligible for dependents’ benefits. Even a divorced spouse or parents may be eligible for disability benefits as part of the program.

The family member is eligible for up to 50% of the benefits that you are receiving.  This can apply to each family member who is eligible for the dependents’ benefits. However, the agency will impose an upper limit on the benefits that your family receives. Typically, the benefits that your entire family receives will not exceed 180% of your benefits amount. If you have several family members who qualify, then the benefits that your family members receive will be reduced accordingly. This will not impact the benefits that you are eligible for. However, if a family member of a disabled worker is are also receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits, then they may not qualify for benefits under the SSDI program.

If you have questions about a family member’s eligibility for disability benefits, contact this law firm.

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In many cases, persons who apply for and receive Social Security benefits may also be eligible for and receive other forms of benefits payments. These can include pension payments and Worker’s Compensation benefits. Your recovery of these other benefits could impact the amount of Social Security disability benefits for which you are eligible.

Your Social Security disability benefits can be reduced if you receive benefits under the Worker’s Compensation program or retirement pension programs. For example, if you qualify for and are receiving Worker’s Compensation benefits, then the law places limits on the amount of the payment that you can receive. You may not be eligible to recover more than 80% of your disability benefits payments in Worker’s Compensation earnings. You may be required to pay the Social Security Administration (SSA) back any extra payments that you may have recovered while receiving benefits under other programs.

Typically, your pensions will not be affected by your Social Security Disability Benefits payments. If the pension payments that you made during your work tenure were exempt from Social Security taxes, then your disability benefits payments can be affected. However, this happens only in rare cases because most pension programs will attract Social Security taxes. If you are on a Long Term Disability plan funded by your employer, then you will have your Social Security Disability Benefits payments reduced or offset as a result of this.

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