Articles Posted in Obesity

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Patients who suffer from rheumatoid arthritis may suffer from an acceleration of their symptoms if they put on an excessive amount of weight or lose too many pounds.

According to new research, obesity and low weight both have an adverse impact on symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. The researchers focused on obesity and its crippling effects on the already very painful symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. Interestingly enough, they found that severe weight loss also worsened symptoms.

According to the researchers, very often, doctors may mistakenly attribute worsening of the symptoms to the actual arthritic condition, and not to the patient’s weight. The researchers are calling on doctors to look out for severe weight loss or weight gain when they treat symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis.

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According to new research, people who suffer from a disability are at a much higher risk of obesity than non-disabled persons. This indicates that obesity may be a much greater physical health challenge for the disabled than earlier believed.

The study found that approximately 42% of American adults who suffer from a disability also suffer from obesity. About 9% also suffer from extreme obesity. In comparison, among adults who did not suffer from any disabilities, nearly 29% were found to be obese, and 3.9% were found to be extremely obese.

The results of the findings were published recently in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. This is believed to be the very first time that obesity has been strongly linked to disability.

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Rates of obesity continue to increase across America. In 2010, The American Medical Association reported that rates of adult obesity in men had risen 7.1% in a twenty year period and 8.1% for women during the same time frame. The State of Georgia Department of Public Health issued a report in 2010 that showed that 30% (approximately 2 million) of adult Georgians are obese.

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The Department of Public Health blames poor diet and exercise for contributing to this unfortunate national trend. Further, the department recognizes that obesity contributes to an increased risk for other medical conditions, such as stroke, diabetes, osteoarthritis, gall bladder disease and some cancers.

The Social Security Administration (SSA) defines obesity as a chronic and complex disease characterized by excessive accumulation of body fat.