Articles Tagged with attorney

Published on:

The Social Security hearing is one of the most critical stages in the processing of a claim for beneifts.  In many cases, the disability hearing is conducted in person. In some cases however, individuals may choose a video hearing.

A video disability hearing differs from an in-person one in that these hearings are conducted via video conference. That means that you will not be in the same room with the Administrative Law Judge who has been assigned to your case.

That doesn’t, however, mean that you can take a video disability hearing lightly. Just because you are not present in the same room as the judge does not mean that the judge will not have access to the evidence that you present, and your audio or visual testimony. The videoconferencing technology is designed to allow the ALJ to evaluate you during the hearing, including your behavior, your physical mannerisms, and other aspects that he or she may deem important to your case. It’s important to have your attorney present with you, regardless of whether you are attending an in-person hearing, or a video hearing.

Published on:

Researchers working on a treatment for Multiple Sclerosis (MS) have reported progress. According to the teams from New York’s Rockefeller University and the University of California-Riverside, they have both used Indazole Chloride to successfully reverse the symptoms of MS. The studies were conducted in mice, and they found that the drug triggered regeneration of the protective coating of the nerve, or myelin sheath, that is typically destroyed when MS sets in.

Multiple Sclerosis is a condition in which a person may suffer from a steady and progressive breakdown of the nervous system, including the senses of hearing and vision, and motor control. As the disease progresses, the person may suffer from problems walking, difficulty with coordination, numb sensations in the arms or legs, muscular weakness, vision problems, hearing loss, loss of balance, and speech problems. Often times, a person with MS may suffer from complete and permanent paralysis.

MS is a disease that affects the body’s immune system and it’s estimated that, in the United States alone. more than 40,000 people suffer this debilitating disease.

Published on:

Colostomy is a surgical procedure that is performed to treat numerous gastrointestinal conditions and injuries, as well as certain types of cancer. During this procedure, one end of the large intestine is brought out through the abdominal wall. Stools are emptied into a bag that is attached to the abdomen.

Sometimes referred to as bowel diversion therapy, colostomies are typically performed when the person is suffering from problems with the lower bowel. Permanent colostomies are very often performed in the case of colon cancer. Colostomy may also be performed when a person suffers from ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, colonic polyps, irritable bowel syndrome, and colorectal cancer.

If you have suffered from any of these conditions, and have undergone a colostomy, it’s recommended that you discuss a potential claim for disability benefits with a Social Security lawyer in Atlanta. The Social Security Administration will consider whether you are unable to work and earn a living as a result of your condition. For instance, if you are unable to lift heavy objects as a result of the surgery, and this condition is likely to be permanent, the SSA may rule that you are unable to go back to a job which did involve lifting heavy objects.