Articles Posted in Arthritis

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A recent study by leading researchers has found a potential connection between gum disease and rheumatoid arthritis.

Beautiful, healthy gums mean not just a perfect smile, but could also mean healthier joints for you. Those findings came from a study that was published recently in the journal, Science Translational Medicine.  Researchers from some of the best institutions in the United States, including Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, examined the gum fluid of people who suffer from periodontitis or gum disease, and found that the fluid contained high levels of a protein, which can trigger symptoms in people who suffer from rheumatoid arthritis.

The findings of the study are far from conclusive. The researchers have no evidence to confirm that everybody who suffers from gum disease is at a high risk of suffering from rheumatoid arthritis, or that everyone who suffers from arthritis, will have the specific immune response to the protein found in the gum fluid. In spite of this, however, it’s good advice to keep your gums healthy.  Pay attention to oral hygiene, because other studies have also linked gum disease to a number of other conditions, including diabetes and stroke.

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Osteoarthritis is a condition characterized by extreme pain, swelling and stiffness of the joints. The condition can make it difficult for a person to stand or walk for long periods of time, and often impairs their ability to work and earn a living.

Osteoarthritis is the slow loss of cartilage from joints. The loss of the cartilage causes friction between bones, resulting in the formation of bone spurs. Osteoarthritis often causes severe pain in the knees, hips, spine and feet.

Early diagnosis of osteoarthritis can help patients who suffer from this condition implement better pain management strategies. Researchers at Warwick University recently announced that they have developed a blood test that can help in the early diagnosis of osteoarthritis.

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Contrary to popular belief, running could actually be beneficial to knee health. According to a new study, recreational running does not have any link to the development of osteoarthritis, and may actually be beneficial to the knee joint.

Earlier studies which have pointed to an association between running and knee arthritis usually focused on professional male runners. However, according to researchers, their new study focused only on non-elite recreational runners. Based on an analysis of 2,683 participants, researchers found that the prevalence of knee pain was lower among runners as compared to non-runners. Among runners, the knee pain rate was 35%, as compared to 41% for those who did not run.

It may be too early to conclude that running has a direct effect on knee health, and therefore directly contributes to a reduced risk of osteoarthritis. Runners generally tend to be closer to their ideal weight and fitter, and are also likely to follow a healthier lifestyle compared to non-runners. These may also be reasons for the reduced occurrence of osteoarthritis.

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Persons who suffer from debilitating knee arthritis may be eligible for Social Security disability benefits if the pain impairs their ability to work and earn a living.

Something as simple as drinking six glasses of milk per week could actually help slow down the progression of painful and disabling knee arthritis in women. According to new research that was funded by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NIH), women who drink more quantities of low fat and fat-free milk see a slower progression of knee arthritis. However, the same results were not seen when men drank the same amount of milk. Furthermore, women in the study did not see the same types of benefits when they consumed other dairy products, such as yogurt or cheese.

Researchers were looking at the effect of dairy products on the progression of knee arthritis, a fairly common form of osteoarthritis, which affects nearly 27 million Americans above the age of 25. Women tend to be much more frequent victims of knee arthritis, which can lead to consistent and disabling pain. The study analyzed more than 1,200 women and monitored the progression of knee arthritis in these women when they consumed significant quantities of milk.

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Persons who suffer from rheumatoid arthritis may experience a number of symptoms including swelling, pain and fatigue that may prevent them from standing for long periods of time, or performing certain routine activities. A new study finds that persons who suffer from rheumatoid arthritis may actually be at a much higher risk for suffering kidney disease.

The study which was conducted at Mayo Clinic focused on 813 people who had been diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis, and compared them with another group of people who did not suffer from the condition. They found that over a period of 20 years, persons who suffered from rheumatoid arthritis had a 25% risk of developing chronic kidney disease. In the general population, the risk was 20%. According to researchers, that may not seem like a statistically significant disparity, but it is quite a big difference, and creates serious implications for the management of rheumatoid arthritis.

Typically, a person who suffers from rheumatoid arthritis may suffer from stiffness of the joints because of inflammation. In fact, this is a hallmark characteristic of this condition, and the stiffened joints make the upper and lower extremities difficult to use. Apart from stiffness, patients may also suffer from chronic pain and severe fatigue, both of which affect their ability to work. Approximately one out of three people who suffer from rheumatoid arthritis leave their jobs.

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Knee osteoarthritis causes chronic pain, stiffness, and difficulty in walking, often making it challenging for individuals to perform routine activities. As a result, going back to work may not be an option for persons with this medical condition. Now, researchers have announced a new non-surgical technique to treat the pain and stiffness that accompanies knee osteoarthritis.

The technique has been developed by researchers at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. According to researchers, they have experimented with a two-solution treatment, which involves a series of injections that are administered to the knee region. This therapy is called prolotherapy, and the results of the study were recently published in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine.

Researchers reported substantial improvement in symptoms in a group of participants who were monitored over a one year period. During the testing time, participants received at least three of the two-solution injections. The researchers found that there was an improvement in symptoms varying from 19.5% to 42.9% compared to the person’s original status.

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Persons, who have undergone knee reconstruction surgery to repair knee ligaments are much more likely to develop arthritis in the affected knee. According to the results of a new study that was released by the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, persons who have undergone knee reconstructive surgery are three times more likely to develop knee arthritis in the repaired knee, compared to the uninjured knee.

Knee arthritis is also referred to as osteoarthritis of the knee, a condition in which the cartilage on the bones begins to wear down. Earlier studies have also found that osteoarthritis is very often linked to knees that have undergone a reconstructive surgery, but the amount of risk was not determined.

The American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons estimates that approximately 200,000 anterior cruciate ligament injuries occur in the country every year. Very often, the surgeons treat injured knees by replacing the torn ligament with a replacement graft. Surgeons believe that between 10 and 15 years after the reconstruction is generally when patients begin to suffer symptoms of knee arthritis.

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Chronic hip pain that is so serious that a person is no longer able to stand or walk now affects many young persons. In fact, researchers recently found a growing incidence of hip pain, or hip impingement, among younger people.

The study was conducted by hip experts at The Ohio State University, and they found that they are seeing an increase in the number of young persons with hip impingement. The experts stated that the ages of these patients range all the way from those in their teens through 60s.

This condition is very frequently seen among young persons who are active and play sports. In many cases these injuries tend to be sports-related, and although the incidence of such hip impingement or chronic pain is also evident in non-athletes, the incidence seems to be higher among those persons who were active round and going through puberty.

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Persons who suffer from osteoarthritis can be eligible for Social Security disability benefits if they can show that their symptoms are severe enough. For example, you may be eligible if you are unable to walk, stand for long periods of time, and have severe back problems.

Osteoarthritis is a condition, in which there is stiffness and swelling in the joints, severe pain, and muscular weakness. The person may also suffer from reduced range of motion in the joints, restricting movement.

According to new research, cartilage damage can help identify the earliest stages of osteoarthritis. The study was conducted by researchers at the Massachusetts Institute Of Technology, who developed a technique that identifies changes that occur in cartilage, after a person engages in high-risk activities like running and jumping.