Articles Posted in Applying for benefits

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When you qualify for Social Security Disability Insurance Benefits (SSDI), you are automatically eligible for a number of forms of assistance.

For starters, you are immediately eligible for monthly cash benefits. These disability benefits will be in the form of checks that you receive every month. The amount will depend on a number of factors, including the amount that you have contributed in taxes to the Social Security system, as well as your work history.

A Social Security disability beneficiary will also become eligible for Medicare benefits. This eligibility will kick in two years after you become eligible to receive disability benefits.

Your dependents may also become eligible for Social Security disability insurance benefits when you qualify for these benefits. Your family members, including your spouse, children, and even ex-spouse may qualify for benefits. Determining which of your family members may become entitled to disability insurance benefits because of your eligibility can be complicated. Talking to an experienced disability lawyer about whether or not your dependents can qualify for benefits is often very helpful.

As a Social Security beneficiary, you may also become eligible to receive back payments that you are owed. These are typically paid in a lump sum, and are generally dated back to the time that you filed the application. Many people are not prepared for the amount of back payments that they can actually receive – the amount is often substantial. It is important to remember that Social Security Administration (SSA) can take months and even years to process a disability claim, and the benefits accumulated during this period of time will be credited to you should you win your case.

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In order to receive Social Security disability benefits for a child suffering from autism, your child must suffer from a number of cognitive impairments and impairments in social and personal functioning.

The Social Security Administration (SSA) will look for signs that a child suffers from multiple types of impairments when evaluating eligibility for benefits on the basis of his autism. For instance, the child must have deficits in social interaction, communication and imagination, and must be limited by his or her activities and interests. These limitations must impact the child’s cognitive, personal, social and social functioning.

Proving these types of impairments is frequently done through the results of standardized tests. For instance, you can establish the extent of cognitive and communicative impairment by using standardized tests as well as special tests for language development. In the case of social functioning impairment, your claim may depend on evaluations by a doctor and observations of the child’s capacity to form relationships, interact with others, including parents, adults, and peers. Personal functioning refers to the child’s ability to look after himself, perform self-grooming tasks and dressing, eating, and visiting the toilet on his own.

A child who suffers from Autism may qualify for Social Security disability benefits, but the symptoms must meet a certain standard in order to be eligible for benefits. The Social Security Administration will require extensive documentation, including your child’s clinical history, standardized test scoring, medical records, lab results, and other documentation. Also, you will want to provide a report from your doctor containing a summary about your child’s treatment. In almost all cases dealing with autism, a skilled lawyer can help increase the chances of success in a claim for disability benefits

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The Social Security Disability Administration (SSA) will consider a number of factors, including the income that you are earning, before it approves your benefits claim. Of primary importance in the processing of your claim is any Substantial Gainful Activity that you are performing. Substantial Gainful Activity is any income that earns you an income beyond a certain limit. In 2015, the limit set by SSA $1,090 per month. You are not eligible for benefits if you earn more than this fixed amount.

However, the income that SSA will calculate will only include work-related benefits. Unemployment benefits are not included in the calculation. Therefore, your unemployment benefits will have no effect on your eligibility for disability benefits from the Social Security Administration. Your unemployment benefits will also not have any effect on the amount of benefits that you receive from SSA.

However, there is a flipside. The benefits that you get from Social Security Administration may lead to a reduction in the amount of unemployment benefits that you receive. For more information on this, it’s best to contact the Georgia Department of Labor or logon to its website and learn whether your unemployment benefits will decrease because of your disability benefits.

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Adults who are disabled before they reach the age of 22 may qualify for child benefits provided a parent is deceased, or has begun receiving retirement or Social Security disability (SSD) benefits. These benefits are typically regarded as child benefits because the payments are paid on the parents’ Social Security record.

In order to qualify for a children benefits, the adult child must be above the age of 18, and must be unmarried. His/her disability must have begun before he/she reached the age of 22. The child in a case like this can include an adopted child of a parent with a Social Security record, or even in some cases, a grandchild, a stepchild or step grandchild.

Typically, child benefits will stop when the child reaches the age of 18, unless the child continues to be a student in elementary or high school. In such cases, however, benefits can continue until the child is 19 years old. However, for a child to qualify for disability benefits on your record after the age of 18, then the above-mentioned conditions must apply. The disability must have begun before the age of 22, and he/she also must meet the disability criteria for adults.

The Social Security Administration’s (SSA) process for approval of disability benefits can be complicated for the layperson to understand. It’s important to seek legal advice when you want to file a claim, and even more important to seek legal help when you want to appeal a claims denial. Remember, many disability benefits claims are rejected in the early stages, and are approved only after an appeal is filed.

So… don’t give up!

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Once you have filed your Social Security Disability benefits claim, it is recommended that you check the status at regular intervals.

It’s also important to understand that the Social Security Administration (SSA) is typically inundated with disability benefits claims, and therefore, a decision may not come early. Further, a decision will depend on a number of factors which include the type of evidence that you submitted, and the nature and severity of your disability. The decision time also depends on whether SSA will require further evidence in the form of a medical examination. All of these factors can delay your claim.

In addition, a decision usually takes time because claims processing is typically a tedious process. It’s therefore important to begin filing your claim immediately. Speak to an Atlanta Social Security disability benefits lawyer for help filing a claim. Also, remember that although most claims are denied initially, you should not give up. Many claimants are able to receive benefits via the appeals process.

While you are waiting for your disability benefits claim to be approved, you can check on the status of your claim. You can do that by logging into the Social Security Administration website at www.ssa.gov, and looking for a whether a decision has been made in your case. You can also call the Social Security Administration on the agency’s toll-free number 1-800-772-1213, Monday throughout Friday, for more information about your claim.

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Having Your Social Security Disability (SSD) claim denied can be disappointing, but it doesn’t mean that all is lost. As long as you take the next best steps, you may very well be able to earn an award of benefits. However, you will want to take action and appeal the denial as quickly as possible.

There are strict time limitations that apply to most appeals, and if you do not file an appeal within the time period, you could actually have a claim dismissed.
Many persons who have their claims denied are so discouraged that they do not appeal. They give up on their claim being approved, fatigued by the long period of time it often takes for a decision. In other cases, people make the mistake of filing a brand-new claim in place of the denied claim.

One of the most important things to do is understand why your claim was denied. In most cases, benefits are denied because the claimant did not submit enough medical evidence to establish the severity of impairment, or the eligibility of the condition. However, disability claim denials are much more common than most people realize. In fact, about 60% of all disability benefit claims are denied at the initial stage.

When you receive a notice from the Social Security Administration (SSA) informing you about the denial, you will also receive a technical explanation of the reasons for the unfavorable decision. SSA will use the notice to inform you that the job you could perform has demands that you are physically equipped to handle. In other words, the agency will deny that your condition is so disabling that it prevents you from going back to work and earning a living.

The first step to take after getting your claim denied is to speak to a Social Security disability lawyer and file an appeal.

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For disability purposes, Crohn’s Disease is in the group of conditions known as Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD). Crohn’s is a chronic inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract. The cause of this disease is not really known – but the most recent research points to family history and environmental factors. In addition, diet and stress are believed to aggravate the condition.

Even if you have chronic gastrointestinal inflammation problems (diarrhea, rectal bleeding, urgent need to move bowels, abdominal cramps and pain, constipation) and think you are showing symptoms, only a doctor can conduct testing to diagnose Crohn’s Disease. Since Crohn’s is considered a chronic disease, there will be periods when the disease is in remission and the patient would have little to no symptoms; however, there will be periods when the disease strikes and the patient is very sick.

How does Social Security Evaluate Crohn’s Disease?

The Social Security Administration (SSA) evaluates Crohn’s Disease in the same way that that it does all claims for disability. It typically requires that a claimant must have suffered from the condition for a period of 12 months, or the condition is expected to last for at least 12 months before approving benefit payments. Social Security does consider Crohn’s disease to be a significant impairment that may prevent an individual from performing substantial work; therefore, it is possible for an individual to be approved for disability benefits on the basis of Crohn’s disease. Crohn’s disease is evaluated under inflammatory bowel disease in the listing of impairments published by the Social Security Administration (SSA).

The roadblock with getting approved for disability with Crohn’s disease is that because it is a chronic disease, the twelve months duration requirement is frequently a problem. In other words, a person is never cured of Crohn’s disease, but sometimes his or her symptoms go away for a short time, allowing the person to resume some activities.

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Cancer is always named for the part of the body where it starts, even if it spreads to other body parts later. When cancer starts in the cervix, it is called cervical cancer. The cervix is the lower, narrow end of the uterus.

The Social Security Administration (SSA) evaluates applications by listing a cervical cancer diagnosis under specific guidelines. Cancers of the uterine cervix diagnosed as carcinoma or sarcoma must meet the following conditions: (a) the cancer must extend to the pelvic wall, lower portion of the vagina or the adjacent or distant organs; or (b) the cancer must be persistent or recurrent following antineoplastic therapy.

Cancer is a very unique disease in that sometimes the treatment, not the disease, is what creates the disability. The antineoplastic therapy is defined by Social Security as surgery, irradiation, chemotherapy, hormones, immunotherapy, or bone marrow or stem cell transplantation. Some of those treatments can be harsh enough to keep a person from being able to seek employment.

Medical records will be necessary as evidence to show the diagnosis and location of the cancer, therapies, and the extent to which the patient has responded (or not), etc.

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When a cancer patient applies for Social Security Disability benefits, eligibility is determined by using the same criteria as for other disability applicants. Merely having a cancer diagnosis does not immediately make a person eligible for benefits. However, certain types of cancer patients may have the processing of their claims expedited, based on the diagnosis alone.

In order to be eligible for benefits because of cancer, you have to meet certain conditions established by the Social Security Administration. For instance, the cancer must be inoperable, with no potential for control using treatment. It must be recurrent or must have spread. A person suffering from some types of cancer however, may be eligible for expedited claims process approvals.

Persons who suffer from certain types of breast cancer, brain cancer, spinal cord cancer, specific types of mesothelioma, and cancers of the gall bladder, or pancreas, may be eligible for an expedited process in which their claims are approved based on the diagnosis. Additionally, in order to qualify for expedited approval, applicants must provide details of their history, work schedule limits and, in some cases, financial criteria. Claims based on many types of cancer may be expedited under the Compassionate Allowances Program, which allows for expedited benefits approval for certain types of ailments and conditions.

The Social Security Administration (SSA) will process a claim for benefits depending on the type of cancer diagnosis, effect on functionality, ability to work and earn a living, and work history.

To determine whether your condition qualifies for Social Security Disability payments, discuss your claim with a qualified disability benefits attorney today.

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It is relatively uncommon that a person will qualify for benefits under both the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program as well as the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program. In fact, the vast majority of benefits recipients will qualify for benefits under only one of these programs.

However, that doesn’t mean that this can’t happen. A person may qualify for benefits under both of these programs. The Social Security Disability Insurance program is unique, distinct and separate from the Supplemental Security Income program. Eligibility criteria for both of the programs are different, but in some circumstances, persons may qualify for benefits under both programs.

If, for instance, your income and asset limits are low enough for you to qualify for the Supplemental Security Income Program, and at the same time you have held a job long enough to have paid into the Disability Insurance program, you could possibly qualify for both of the benefits simultaneously. These types of benefits are called “concurrent benefits.”

However, even if you do qualify, that doesn’t mean that you will get double the benefits. There are limits on your benefits, and you may only be eligible for money to a maximum of those that are available under the Supplemental Security Income program.

It can difficult to determine if you qualify for benefits under the Social Security Disability Insurance program or the Supplemental Security Income program. This is a good reason to seek the advice of a social security lawyer who is familiar with the system and application processes.