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Social Security Disability Benefits for Children

Adults who are disabled before they reach the age of 22 may qualify for child benefits provided a parent is deceased, or has begun receiving retirement or Social Security disability (SSD) benefits. These benefits are typically regarded as child benefits because the payments are paid on the parents’ Social Security record.

In order to qualify for a children benefits, the adult child must be above the age of 18, and must be unmarried. His/her disability must have begun before he/she reached the age of 22. The child in a case like this can include an adopted child of a parent with a Social Security record, or even in some cases, a grandchild, a stepchild or step grandchild.

Typically, child benefits will stop when the child reaches the age of 18, unless the child continues to be a student in elementary or high school. In such cases, however, benefits can continue until the child is 19 years old. However, for a child to qualify for disability benefits on your record after the age of 18, then the above-mentioned conditions must apply. The disability must have begun before the age of 22, and he/she also must meet the disability criteria for adults.

The Social Security Administration’s (SSA) process for approval of disability benefits can be complicated for the layperson to understand. It’s important to seek legal advice when you want to file a claim, and even more important to seek legal help when you want to appeal a claims denial. Remember, many disability benefits claims are rejected in the early stages, and are approved only after an appeal is filed.

So… don’t give up!