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Diabetes Linked to Accelerated Cognitive Decline: Will I Qualify for Disability Benefits?

According to new research in the Annals of Internal Medicine Journal, people who are unable to control their diabetes are much more likely to experience a faster rate of cognitive decline. This would include the onset of symptoms such as poor memory, poor word recall, and impaired functioning. According to the recent study, approximately 19% of the participants who were analyzed were found to experience such symptoms. In fact, researchers found that these participants experienced cognitive decline five years earlier than people who did not suffer from diabetes.

Cognitive decline can be extremely difficult for an individual, and it is often associated with dementia. A large number of studies now link diabetes to dementia. For example, one study found that people who suffer from Type II diabetes have a higher risk of suffering from Alzheimer’s disease.

Controlling diabetes is critical, and studies continue to point to the serious long-term health consequences of failure to control blood sugar levels.

Persons with diabetes who want to apply for Social Security disability benefits must prove that their condition prevents them from performing activities in the work environment. If follows that not everybody who suffers from diabetes automatically qualifies for benefits. If your diabetes is under control and does not impair your ability to live a normal life, it is highly unlikely that you will receive benefits. However, if you have limitations with bending, standing, sitting for long periods of time, you may be entitled to disability payments. In addition, the existence of complications such as renal failure and impaired vision may also help an applicant quality for social security disability benefits.