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People with Disability at Greater Risk of Obesity

According to new research, people who suffer from a disability are at a much higher risk of obesity than non-disabled persons. This indicates that obesity may be a much greater physical health challenge for the disabled than earlier believed.

The study found that approximately 42% of American adults who suffer from a disability also suffer from obesity. About 9% also suffer from extreme obesity. In comparison, among adults who did not suffer from any disabilities, nearly 29% were found to be obese, and 3.9% were found to be extremely obese.

The results of the findings were published recently in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. This is believed to be the very first time that obesity has been strongly linked to disability.

Earlier research has also tried to link disability to obesity, but there had been deficiencies in those studies, and the findings were based on an obesity prevalence among people with a disability that was at just between 39% and 31%. The new study put that number closer to 42%.

Data for the study came from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, which includes data collected from physical examinations of Americans as well as interviews about diet and nutrition. Obesity rates, as well as health information from more than 11,000 American adults who suffer from a disability, were compiled as part of the research, and then compared to data involving more than 20,000 people without disabilities.

Apart from the higher risk of obesity, disabled persons were also found to be much more likely to suffer from chronic illnesses like diabetes, high cholesterol levels as well as hypertension. In addition, many were likely to be on high blood pressure medication, as well as medications to lower lipid levels.

Our law firm helps clients receive disability benefits, as well as work through other health challenges such as obesity and high blood pressure.